The Phoenixian Book of Creatures

Devil Monkey Devil Monkey

A giant dog-like monkey found in British Columbia and the Appalachian Mountain region of the United States.

These are aggressive creatures known for attacking humans, pets, livestock, and even moving cars. Fortunately encounters are rare.

They stand from 3 to 8 feet tall, have pointy ears, are hairy and tailed, with occasional reports of a tailless variety. The fur is dark with a white blaze at the neck and underbelly.

They are baboon-like or dog-like and walk both bipedally and quadrupedally, the young may have a kangaroo-like appearance. Other reports suggest that the adults also resemble as well as move like kangaroos, yet another report describes a similar creature but the word "cat-like" is used. They are clawed and leave three toed footprints.

They are well muscled, able to run fast enough to keep up with a quickly accelerating car for a short distance, and can leap across a two lane road in one bound.

On one occasion a search party was formed to track an unknown creature thought to be a devil monkey but the tracking dogs refused to follow the trail.

Also known as a giant monkey, and may be related to the nalusa falaya.

See Also: Creatures by Type » Primates

References

Arment, Chad. Virginia Devil Monkey Reports. North American BioFortean Review Volume 2, Number 1 (2000). Web site: http://www.strangeark.com/nabr/NABR3.pdf Retrieved on 02/06/2010.

Arment, Chad. Devil Monkeys or Wampus Cats? North American BioFortean Review Volume 2, Number 2 (2000). Web site: http://www.strangeark.com/nabr/NABR4.pdf Retrieved on 02/06/2010.

Eberhart, George, M. Mysterious Creatures: A Guide to Cryptozoology. California: ABC-CLIO, 2002.

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